Internet Radio – Part 2

  • February 1, 2012
  • C, Code, ...

I said I would put some more photographs of the clock, so here we go. These were taken after the radio board and power connectors were completely removed.

The clock module is entirely mechanical, save for the constant-speed motor that ran the mechanism (now defunct, and 110v, yeesh.) but doesn’t it look nice!

The front of the clock module through the plastic cover

The dial on the left is the alarm rotor, which is a simple stepped cam triggering a microswitch on the back of the module – see the later photographs. The split-flap digits are perfect, no damage at all, and the action is smooth and constant.

The sleep timer, which rotates a cam past a second microswitch.

The Sleep timer rotates a small cam against a second switch on the top of the module. Nice! I spy an interrupt pin input!

The back of the clock module, showing the alarm microswitch and the back of the alarm display spindle

The alam rotor moves the metal arm shown on the right of the photograph above, and triggers quickly at ‘alarm time’ then slowly re-presses the arm against the switch over the course of approximately an hour, I spy another interrupt!

 

The switches along the top of the radio

The switches along the top of the radio are simple nPnT type, one with four position – the On/Off/Wake to music/Wake to alarm switch – and the other with two positions – the current AM/FM switch.

The four position switch will remain unchanged, both in function and device, but the AM/FM switch is obviously redundant now, and I will *probably* repurpose that as a stream/saved selector.

The switches actuate small plates behind the front panel with white markers in appropriate places.

The front panel includes a thin section along the top above the tuning gauge containing various basic indicators, composed of holes in the front panel with a sliding plastic indicator with white splotches at the appropriate position.

It is my intention to keep this top section intact for the final build, (as it covers the back of the switches!) ¬†and all but two of the indicators make sense for the final build’s features.

The rest of the case is wholly uninteresting, and is mainly open space, leaving plenty of room for new electronics, and currently only contain the new power socket (a basic barrel-jack socket and two wires hot-glued in place over the existing grommet hole for power) and a medium-sized speaker with no markings (which will be investigated in a future post).

Until next time.

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